Category: Articles (Page 1 of 5)

Unbox: Newbies Adventure PS4 Review

Unbox-Newbies-Adventure-Nintendo-SwitchLadies and gentleman the video game world gives you Unbox: Newbies adventure a cardboard box in a cardboard box world. The story begins when a team of people from the GPS( Global Postal Service) by the names of Bounce, Dash and Digi use there machine called the Box-o-matic to create a self made Box named Newbie. Newbies goal or should I say your goal is to save the GPS from impending bankruptcy,however in the mitts of it all is a Sinister boss known as Boss wild and his group of Wild cards that are out to stop Newbie by any means necessary. 

In order to save the GPS your goal is to collect stamps from different worlds in the game and defeat Boss wild. To collect stamps you will need to help different box people with different objectives and or tasks like finding items,parts for those items, racing though a course, saving boxes and of course we can not forget you guessed it!! Delivering mail LOL. The challenges go from easy to intense which is a spot on way to get your true game on. Some challenges can be tough but rewarding when beaten. Keep in mind you are being timed through most of the challenges so that can be nerve racking. 

To control Newbie you of course use the lift stick to move him. For moves Newbie can jump using R1 or R2 and also has a super jump called unboxed. Unboxed while using L1 or L2 allows you to bounce in mid air and reach far places that a normal jump can’t. You do have a limit of 6 unboxed times you can use until it’s empty but can recharged it by finding unboxed items or checkpoints. Newbie also has an attack called the ground attack… “you first jump then press circle to perform it.” I will say controlling newbie for the first time can be frustrating because it can feel like your losing control and also slippery when landing on small platforms and may end up dying a lot or have to start over on missions that involve you going up a building. Once you can over come “controlling issues” the game is really fun to play and the challenges are “to me” very enjoyable. 

The visuals in this game is colorful and cutesy with a modern cartoon feel which would tickle the young at heart. Its also an open world which is cool and gives you the chance to explore beautiful scenery that is very enjoyable to the eye. You can also interact with most things like riding cars, forklifts, sitting on lawn chairs and so on “to me it was really fun to fool around with all of theses.” There is a shop where you can customize yourself with different types of boxes designs with also add on’s of hats, caps, glasses and other variety’s. “I must have spent hours deciding what character to make in that shop and I feel you will too.” For an open world I was a little sad cause it is a beautiful place, it just didn’t have much to use and with an open world I want to be wowed with stuff that I can interact with but the game only delivered a little.  I would have like to see more shops because there is only one to my knowledge, would have liked different things to drive in or even fly planes, and more weapons to fight the evil wild cards. I do find the challenges fun and there are a lot of challenges to complete but for the non challenges very weak on things to interact with. 

There are a lot of problems that can occur in the game. There are many times that you will get stuck and stick a lot or even go trough the platform. They have a re-spawned bottom on the control to go to your checkpoint but if its far away it can be annoying because a lot of these objectives have time limits. With theses problems it made intense challenges and gaming unpleasant hopefully they will have updates to fix these issues in the near future. 

Newbie is a fun game with some interesting ideas. I did find the challenges fun, I couldn’t put it down but for open world free time is not so fun. Would I play it again yes but it will be awhile. I give it a 7 out of 10. 

 

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GameLoading: Rise of the Indies

Video games are bigger than they’ve ever been before. Invading every corner of life, games are now more accessible and diverse, creating hardcore and casual gamers alike. Now that game culture is in the limelight and games criticism and history are being taken seriously (you’d be surprised by the multitude of academic courses being offered), it was only a matter of time before games made there way to the big screen.

Documentaries about games are nothing new. Films like The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters and Indie Game: The Movie are now readily available on a variety of streaming services. But, if you’re like us, then you can’t get enough of these films.

Which is why StudioBento’s GameLoading: Rise of the Indies is such a fresh piece. The title may sound like it tells a straightforward history of indie games, but that’s not the focus here. Instead, it revolves around the zeitgeist, i.e. the past handful of years. The film focuses and follows more than handful of indie developers working on their latest projects. Games such as The Stanley Parable, Thomas Was Alone, That Dragon, Cancer, SoundSelf and many more are shown side by side with their developers during the many stages of production.

We see the highs and lows of game developing: initial planning stages, the years dedicated to programming, the launch of a game, the recognition it receives, the possibility that someone may make your game before you do. Some of these moments are more exhilarating than others (some are downright sad and terrifying) but they all instill a sense of awe. A sense of inspiration. A sense that anyone can do this.

It’s the last part that really hits home. As fun and interesting as all this is, the feeling of inspiration that slowly creeps into you throughout the duration of the film is what stands it apart from other documentaries exploring the same subject. You don’t need a legion of developers to make a great game. In many cases it only takes a handful of people, often times just two.

If I walked away with anything from this film its that the playing field is finally leveled. The tools to make games are now readily available, oftentimes for free. Local meet-ups are popping up all over the map and there is a plethora of online communities are dedicated to game developing. It even gave my friend and I an idea for a game that we’d like to make (mind you, we have zero experience at this and no, we won’t tell you what it is. Yet.). Overall, I can’t recommend GameLoading: Rise of the Indies enough. If you love games or are looking for something inspiring to watch then we highly suggest you check it out.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have a game to go make.

Check out the website for GameLoading here and check out the trailer below:

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PAX East 2015

We had an excellent time at PAX East this year.  Here’s some pics.

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The-Gambler-2014

Film Ramblings: Walking out on The Gambler

Have you ever walked out on a movie before? I’m not talking about excusing yourself to use the restroom or running to the lobby for a soda refill. I’m talking about getting up while the movie is still rolling, pre-end credits, and leaving. It’s the equivalent of giving up, of throwing your hands up in the air and admitting defeat. Movies are my life, my passion. It’s what I wake up thinking about, it’s what I go to sleep dreaming about. I pride myself in being able to sit through a film, even if it’s terrible (2014 had some serious stinkers), sticking through it until the bitter end. I was brutally reminded the other night of how frail the human condition actually is as I walked out of my first movie since, I don’t know, junior high school? Was it for Scary Movie 3? Probably. The movie I saw wasn’t necessarily a parody, but looking back on it the film certainly is a gross parody masquerading as a film. The movie I saw was The Gambler.

Yeah, get a good look at that poster up top. Look at Mark Whalberg’s long, frazzled hair. Looks like he’s been through a lot, eh? “The only way out is all in.” That tagline should pretty much tell you what you’re getting yourself into. A man on the edge, a man with nothing to lose, a man who is compared to the main character of Albert Camus’ The Stranger repeatedly. Whalberg plays an English professor who also happens to be a down-on-his-luck gambler who is in massive debt. Stop me if you’ve heard this before.

“…the cinematography and editing are borderline atrocious”

 

I have no idea how to play cards, poker, or roulette. I know absolutely nothing about casinos.  The Gambler may bore some viewers who are like me, since there is no exposition on how the games Mark participates in are played. Casino Royale tried to remedy this by explaining each move the players made via two onlooking characters, There’s no such luck here in The Gambler. Any sense of heightened suspense was completely lost. I realize this isn’t necessarily a slight against the movie; it’s my own fault for never learning to play these games. Regardless, I could care less since the cinematography and editing are borderline atrocious. Music can help enhance a scene but they way music is handled here does the exact opposite. The way a song drastically cuts out (is it trying to mimic an indie movie?) will tear you right out of the experience. It’s a lousy and clumsy move. And that goes for the majority of what I saw in this film. There are plenty of movies that may not excite me plot-wise, but if they look and sound pretty then I can settle for that. This is just drab.

Is Mark Whalberg known for ad libbing? There is a scene in The Gambler where Mahky Mahk is sitting in a bath tub watching one of his college students playing a basketball game when his mother (played by a very underutilized Jessica Lange) barges in, accusing him of making bets on the game. Walrus-burger begins a rant, in classic Whalbergian form, about how he would never do that. Remember how in Transformers 4 Mahk keeps reminding the audience that he’s an inventor? Imagine all that crammed into a thirty-second rant, ad infinitum. Yes, we get it, you would never do that. Yes, we get it the second time that you would never do that. For the fifth time We. Get It. There’s a scene in Birdman where Edward Norton’s character tells Michael Keaton’s Riggan Thomson that his lines keep repeating themselves. That the audience already understands what he’s saying through the first line of dialogue. Stop beating them over the head! That’s how this scene feels. It’s hard to tell whether this is Whalberg’s magic at play or actual lines of dialogue in the script. Either way it’s mind-numbing.

I don’t like giving up on movies but I just couldn’t do this one. I haven’t been this bored, this appalled, this angry at seeing a movie in ages. It’s very rare that this scenario happens. The warning signs were all there, it’s one of the first releases of January, the notorious dumping ground for the studios. I honestly can’t recommend this movie to anyone.

Mahky Mahk Walrusburer

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SteelSeries Giveaway

We are happy to announce our first giveaway/contest!

We need a spiffy, new logo. You need swag. Let’s make a deal. We want you to make your logo the universal standard for Static Rift. That’s right, your logo will be the one, singular image for all of the various manifestations of The Rift throughout the internet. As such, we must lay down some guidelines but instead we’re gonna jack an industry standard.

Entries should follow YouTube’s guidelines for channel art, which can be found here.

Create us a new logo following those guidelines and we’ll reward you with a brand new SteelSeries Apex gaming keyboard and Rival optical mouse, a perfect pair for your gaming needs! Message us with your results and earn our undying gratitude. And gaming swag.

Check out Dan’s review of the SteelSeries keyboard here:

To enter,

1. Like us on facebook and Follow our twitter:

2. Send your entries to staticrift2013@gmail.com put ‘Steelseries Giveaway’ in the subject line and your facebook url and twitter handle in the body!

Submissions end Friday October 17th.

*U.S. and Canada only.

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